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What to expect after tooth extraction

You should not experience any problems of a severe nature following your extraction today, but the following information will help to answer any questions you may have.

Strenuous exercise is best avoided for the rest of the day.

Do not rinse your mouth out for 24 hours after the tooth has been removed. This allows a clot to form which is a vital part of the healing process. You may have a drink, but don’t vigorously rinse. After this time, rinse with warm salty water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a glass of water) to promote healing. This can be done after eating, or as often as you wish during this phase of healing.

Avoid hot drinks, alcohol, smokinq, hard or chewy foods for the rest of the day. Choose cool drinks and minced or soft food.

Do not chew with the teeth near the extraction site for the rest of the day. Chew on the other side of your mouth if possible.

It is best to keep your head elevated for 24 hours or so after an extraction. To achieve this, you should give yourself an extra pillow at bedtime. You may also find it useful to lay a towel over the pillow, just in case there is any minor bleeding during the night.

You will have some blood in your saliva. This is normal. If you are concerned about the amount of bleeding, or if you start to spit out large amounts of dark clotted blood, sit down (don’t lie flat) and place a gauze pressure pack over the wound. Hold this in place with firm biting pressure for about 15 minutes. If this is not successful, try it a second time. If it is still not successful, please give us a call.

You should have very little or no pain following this procedure. If you experience any pain at all, a mild analgesic such as paracetamol (“Panadol”) or ibuprofen (“Nurofen” or ‘Act 3”) should adequately control it if used as directed. Ongoing or delayed-onset pain is often a sign of infection. Please call us – this can usually be treated very effectively by a quick, simple procedure.

What to expect after having your immediate denture fitted

It is normal to undergo some degree of post-operative swelling arid pain following multiple teeth extractions, but the following information may help to reduce these effects and to answer any questions you may have.

Strenuous exercise is best avoided for the next few days. Heavy contact sports such as football should be avoided for up to 6 weeks while the new bone forms (to avoid the possibility of jaw fracture).

Do not rinse your mouth out for 24 hours after the teeth have been removed. This allows clots to form, which is a vital part of the healing process. You may have a drink, but don’t vigorously rinse. After this time, rinse with warm salty water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a glass of water) to promote healing. This can be done after eating, or as often as you wish during this phase of healing.

Alternatively, you may rinse with SAVACOL mouthwash (available from the chemist or grocery store), which will aid your GENTLE brushing of the area.

Avoid hot drinks, alcohol, smokinq, hard or chewy foods for the rest of the day. Choose cool drinks and minced or soft food. You will know when you are able to get back to normal eating.

It is best to keep your head elevated for 24 hours or so after any extraction. To achieve this, you should give yourself an extra pillow at bedtime. You may also find it useful to lay a towel over the pillow, just in case there is any minor bleeding during the night.

You will have some blood in your saliva. This is normal. If you are concerned about the amount of bleeding, or if you start to spit out large amounts of dark clotted blood, sit down (don’t lie flat) and place a gauze pressure pack over the wound. Hold this in place with firm biting pressure for about 15 minutes. If this is not successful, try it a second time. If it is still not successful, please give us a call.

Your level of pain following this procedure will depend on a large number of variables. However, some pain, swelling and bruising is inevitable. Use of ice packs wrapped in cloth (even frozen peas) over the area will help enormously to control both pain and swelling. As well, a mild analgesic such as paracetamol (“Panadol”) or ibuprofen (“Nurofen” or “Act 3”) during the day.

It is extremely important that you do not take the denture out until we see you for your post-operative check tomorrow.

What to expect after extraction of wisdom teeth

It is normal to undergo some degree of postoperative swelling and pain following wisdom teeth extractions, but the following information may help to reduce these effects and to answer any questions that you may have.

Strenuous exercise is best avoided for the next few days. Heavy contact sports such as football should be avoided for up to 6 weeks while the new bone forms (to avoid the possibility of jaw fracture).

Do not rinse your mouth out for about 4 hours after the teeth have been removed. This allows a clot to form which is a vital part of the healing process. You may have a drink, but don’t vigorously rinse. After this time, rinse with warm salty water (1/2 teaspoon of salt in a glass of water) to promote healing. This can be done after eating, or as often as you wish during this phase of healing.

Avoid hot drinks, alcohol, smokinq, hard or chewy foods for the rest of the day. Choose cool drinks and minced or soft food. You will know when you are able to get back to normal eating.

It is best to keep your head elevated for 24 hours or so after an extraction. To achieve this, you should give yourself an extra pillow at bedtime. You may also find it useful to lay a towel over the pillow, just in case there is any minor bleeding during the night.

You will have some blood in your saliva. This is normal. If you are concerned about the amount of bleeding, or if you start to spit out large amounts of dark clotted blood, sit down (don’t lie flat) and place a gauze pressure pack over the wound. Hold this in place with firm biting pressure for about 15 minutes. If this is not successful, try it a second time. If it is still not successful, please give us a call.

Your level of pain following this procedure will depend on a large number of variables. However, some pain, swelling and bruising is inevitable. Use of ice packs wrapped in cloth (even frozen peas) over the area will help enormously to control both pain and swelling. As well, a mild analgesic such as paracetamol (“Panadol”) or ibuprofen (“Nurofen” or “Act 3”) during the day and the prescription analgesic we have given you for use at night, should adequately control your pain level if used as directed.

You will probably have restricted opening of your mouth for up to 2 weeks following the procedure. This too is normal and your ability to open normally will quickly return.

If you do have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to ask or call.

What to expect after removal of nerve

You have had the pulp (nerve) removed from your tooth today and the following information will help to answer any questions that you may have.

You should have very little or no pain after the first 24 (or at most 48) hours following this procedure. If you experience any pain at all in the initial day or so a mild analgesic such as paracetamol (“Panadol”) or ibuprofen (“Nurofen” or “Act 3”) should adequately control if it is used as directed. Ongoing, severe, or delayed-onset pain is often a sign of a need for further interventive treatment. Please call us – this can usually be treated very effectively by a second procedure.

Unfortunately in cases where there has been substantial tissue damage to the pulp of the tooth, the procedure carried out today is not always immediately effective, due to the need to control the effects of bacteria which may have migrated beyond the end (apex) of the tooth. So it is reasonably common for an initial period of 24 to 48 hours to pass prior to significant improvement, as outlined above.

In a lot of cases, however, the tooth will settle down immediately. This is, of course, the desired outcome. If this does occur, it does not mean that no further treatment is required for the tooth. The root-canal treatment is always a multi-stage procedure, requiring at least 1 or 2 further follow-up appointments. The absence of pain is at this stage, an indication of successful management of the problem, not its eradication.

Don’t hesitate to let us know if you are concerned about any effects of your treatment.

What to expect after root canal treatment

You have had the pulp (nerve) canal system of your tooth sealed today and the following information will help to answer any questions that you may have.

You should have very little or no pain after the first 24 (or at most 48) hours following this procedure. If you experience any pain at all in the initial day or so a mild analgesic such as paracetamol (“Panadol”) or ibuprofen (“Nurofen” or “Act 3”) should adequately control if it is used as directed. Ongoing, severe, or delayed-onset pain is often a sign of a need for further interventive treatment should be discussed with us if this occurs. Please call us if you are concerned.

In the vast majority of cases, however, the tooth will give you no pain or discomfort at all. This is, of course, the desired outcome. If this is the case, we regard the treatment, to this point, as successful.

Most root-filled teeth are weakened significantly by the disease process that caused the need for treatment, and by its essential management (which you have just undergone). It is advisable to strengthen the remaining tooth structure as much as possible following root-canal-treatment, by restoring the access cavity and any weak or damaged areas of the tooth with either gold or porcelain.

If we have not discussed this with you as yet, it is likely that we have judged the amount of damage to be minimal enough not to require this type restoration. However, please remind us that we need to cover this with you for the sake of your peace of mind.

Don’t hesitate to let us know if you are concerned about any effects of your treatment.

What to expect after a composite restoration

The restorative treatment you have had completed today has been carried out using adhesive dental material technology.

Restorations done this way are virtually fully set and hard by the time you leave our office. The means that, unlike silver amalgam fillings which take several hours to become hard enough to chew with, you may eat as soon as you like.

Please be careful if you are numb though!

Very few fillings done this way exhibit sensitivity to heat, cold, or chewing. However, these side effects are always a possibility and not alarm you as long as they settle down within a short time.

Please let us know if you have any problems which persist, or which are very severe.

Don’t hesitate to let us know if you are concerned about any effects of your treatment.

What to expect after Crown Preparation appointment

When a tooth is prepared to receive a crown, the outer layer of the tooth is reduced, an impression is taken, and the plastic temporary crown is placed over the cut surface to protect the tooth from damage during the fabrication of the final crown. This fabrication is usually about two weeks or so.

The preparation of the tooth may cause a little irritation to the pulp (nerve) of the tooth if the tooth has not been previously root-filled. Consequently, a degree of post-operative discomfort is not uncommon. This is almost always treatable with minor analgesics such as Aspirin or Paracetamol, and usually passes within 24 hours. Sometimes it is the gum which is sensitive rather than the tooth, even though it may feel like it is centred on the tooth. This may occur even if the pulp has been removed from the tooth.

Please don’t be alarmed if you have these mild symptoms which pass quickly.

Temporary crowns are made of acrylic (which is flexible), and cemented in with a soft, weak glue which is designed to enable easy removal when the time comes to cement the final crown (with much stronger glue, of course), so please be careful when eating. You will certainly be able to eat a steak with confidence, but please avoid chewing on sticky toffees, Minties and similar, as they will quickly break down the weak glue and dislodge the temporary crown.

Don’t hesitate to let us know if you are concerned about any effects of your treatment.